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Thursday Movie Picks: French Films

This is the last theme of the month for Wandering Through The Shelves' Movie Meme! Entries have been somewhat of a staple around here, so if you still haven't joined, it's not too late! This week's theme: French films. My knowledge of film has grown intensively because of the internet and American films employing French actors. While my movie-watching habits haven't switched to the non-English category, I've been slowly dipping my toes to European film, albeit in limited works. I've always admired the French's creativity when it comes to their work; they're very free when it comes to expression. I haven't seen a great share of French cinema, or even some of the lauded work from influential directors, but I'm slowly getting there. Here are my picks for this week:

I could make this list consist of just Lea Seydoux's films, but this is her most acclaimed work yet. A story about the relationship between Adele and Emma, the film made waves because of the 10-minute sex scene, but the beauty of the story lies at the second half of the film. There were so many heartbreaking scenes that you wish you can just go and be a friend they can talk to. Both actresses were equally fantastic; this is one of the best films I have seen of the year. 

The premise of the movie is strange, but I really like the chemistry of the real life couple Marion Cotillard and Guilluame Canet. Their relationship started with making dares with each other, challenging one another as they grew up, fell in love, and their paths started to unravel. I've always found the way things ended unsatisfactory, but thinking about it, it's an apt ending for their relationship. 

I found this to be quite endearing despite its bleak setting. A cheerful boy gets born in a family where they make money off people's misery. It's set on a dystopian world, where people are allowed to commit suicide (but there are rules, such as no suicide attempts in public - if they don't die, they will go to jail). Because of his sad surrounding, he and his friends set out to change his family's outlook in life. It was entertaining, and interesting, despite everyone being so depressed and mopey all the time. 

Comments

  1. Obviously we agree on Blue. Haven't seen the other two. Both sound interesting, especially The Suicide Shop. Great picks.

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  2. French film has always been my preferred film. The honesty is so freeing in these films. They understand that life has ups, down and in betweens, and they realize that coming at you with nothing but pure emotion isn't accurate. I love the way they can deal with such weighty issues while maintaining an honest humor about things. Nice write up and suggestions. I highly recommend 'Declaration of War', which came out in 2012. It's a great example of the tonal honesty I was referring to.

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  3. I loved Blue. Haven't seen the others, but I'm pretty sold on Love Me If You Dare.

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    1. It's an interesting film and I like the chemistry between the two leads.

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  4. Wow the animation in that one looks incredible! so glad to see Blue here as well

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    1. French animated films are a delight to watch (I haven't seen a movie that I didn't like); this was vibrant against its bleak situation.

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  5. Love Love Me If You Dare. I've been trying to get a dvd copy to own but it seems the English subtitled versions are out of print :). It's been a long time since I've actually seen the movie but I felt the ending was symbolical and yes apt for the two of them.
    Wandering through the Shelves

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